IllogiScript

From Illogicopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
  This is a decent article, but it's not enough for a programming language.  
This article is burly men unfolding umbrellas.
  Maybe you should help it on its way.  
Panneau travaux.svg





IllogiScript is a programming language especially made for Illogicopedia.

Basics[edit]

DEFINE X
START
X = Lel.
#Sets X to lel.
PRINT X
END

DEFINE is used to define variables.

START and END are pretty self-explanatory, they define the main function.

We define X and set it from NULL to the "Lel.".

PRINT is the way you put data on the final page, like straight out of python.

Therefore, this function will return "Lel.".

Also, #s are used for comments.

Hax[edit]

DEFINE X
START
X = GETWORKINGWINCODE(IllogiGames:The Maze)
PRINT X
END

The GETWORKINGWINCODE function is the easiest way to hack. It gets you the fol-proof way to win the game, even if the final win page is protected somehow.

Therefore, this code will print the win code of IllogiGames:The Maze.

You can also use the WIN function to quickly get the win page of a game, it'll be faster but it may not always work.

START
PRINT WIN(IllogiGames:The Rain of Dead Cats)
END

Like here.

Functions[edit]

FUNC F = PARAMS(X) CODE(
  PRINT X
)
START
F(10)
END

Custom functions are created with the FUNC keyword.

The PARAMS keyword will define the parameters of the funtion, and the CODE parameter defines the function itself.

Math[edit]

START
PRINT MATH(2+2)
END

Math also works, but it's in a function.

Because math follows some of the most basic math rules, this would return 5.

Data types[edit]

There is no data types except for NULL numbers and strings. When a variable is defined, it's NULL. When a value is given, it beomes a string, and when the string matches the conditions of a number (ONLY 0-9 allowed), it becomes available for maths.

DEFINE X
START
PRINT X
#prints NULL
X = String
PRINT X
#prints String
X = 123
PRINT MATH(X+1)
#prints 138
X = 123,456
PRINT MATH(X+1)
#prints ERROR: Can't do math with strings

There is a workaround to allow formatted numbers.

DEFINE X
START
X = 123,456
FORMATRAW(X)
PRINT MATH(X+2)
#Would return 123471

Using the FORMAT (to format numbers) and FORMATRAW (to unformat numbers).